Travel and tourism (siyaahah)

Travel and tourism (siyaahah)

The ruling on working as an engineer varies according to the nature of the building of which he will be in charge of the design and construction. Ruling on taking part in building a resort village. Travelling for the purpose of mere tourism is haraam. Travelling to a land in which evil is widespread. Ruling on travelling for fun (tourism). Travel and tourism (siyaahah) in Islam – rulings and types. Ruling on building tourist resorts and taking part in that. Ruling on working in the tourism field as a booking agent. He drives a taxi and takes passengers to bars and night clubs. Ruling on mediating in the sale of a tourist village. Ruling on selling souvenirs for tourists. Using a credit card from a British bank when travelling abroad. Working in the construction and finishing of hotels and resorts. Should he accept his father’s money that was earned from haraam sources? . Ruling on taking off hijaab when travelling abroad. A taxi driver takes some people to haraam places. Going to visit places and mosques in which the Prophet prayed. Taxi driver taking passengers to forbidden places.

The ruling on working as an engineer varies according to the nature of the building of which he will be in charge of the design and construction
I work for a company as an architectural engineer. Right now we have a project that covers a very large area (a suburb on the outskirts of the capital), which will contain various facilities (residential, tiurism, commercial, educational, entertainment, medical, and so on). As you know, in the tourism facilities and those that are connected to riba-based banks, many haraam activities will be conducted. Most of the companies in my country do design for these things but – by the grace of Allah, to Whom be praise – the company for which I work respects the religious principles that I adhere to and follow on the basis of strong conviction, and I keep away from that which is haraam (and it is Allah Whose help we seek). They have suggested that I should be responsible for the design and construction management of the residential and medical facilities of the project mentioned above, without any direct involvement in any haraam activities, in sha Allah. Furthermore, the area of the residential facilities is much greater than the haraam facilities. And Allah knows best. What is the ruling on my working for them on the project mentioned above, on the basis that the halaal facilities will be built all together in one subdivision alongside the tourist facilities and other haraam facilities? Is it permissible to design hotels that may be part of a project of a similar nature (a mixed-use subdivision), but they will be four-star hotels, i.e., they will not offer alcohol and their guests will be families? Is it permissible to develop work and management systems for these projects, and to help them set up branches for the company in neighbouring countries, for companies such as these that do activities that mix halaal and haraam at the same time, without my being directly involved in that which is haraam? We hope that you can give comprehensive advice about the general guidelines for engineers working in the construction boom in the region, in the light of the mixing of halaal with haraam, as mentioned above.

Praise be to Allah

In the case of one who is working in the field of engineering, whether in planning, supervision or maintenance, his work must match one of the following three scenarios: 

1.

Where he is involved in the construction of haraam buildings, such as banks, breweries, tourist resorts, churches, and similar places of sin and disbelief (kufr). The ruling on such actions is very clear, which is that it is prohibited, by which we mean that the prohibition applies to all types of participation in building them. That comes under the heading of cooperating in sin and transgression, which Allah, may He be exalted, has forbidden in the verse in which He says (interpretation of the meaning): but do not help one another in sin and transgression. And fear Allah. Verily, Allah is Severe in punishment” [al-Maa’idah 5:2]

For more details on that, please see the answer to question no. 47513.

2.

Where he is involved in the construction of Islamically prescribed or permissible buildings, such as mosques, homes and hotels that will not be used for sinful purposes. The ruling on that is that it is permissible, and there is no difference of opinion concerning that among the scholars. 

3.

Where he is involved in the construction of buildings or places where halaal and haraam are mixed, such as building integrated cities or subdivisions, in which there are mosques and homes, but there are also churches, banks and tourist facilities. The ruling in this case is that it is not permissible for him to be involved in the planning of the haraam places, or to supervise their construction or maintenance, but it is permissible for him to work on the construction of permissible places and buildings. 

See the answer to question no. 82292 

What we have said about the work of an engineer is also applicable to the work of accountants, labourers and others who work in the public or private sector, who may be faced in the course of their work with tasks that involve haraam elements, even though their work is permissible in principle. There is nothing wrong with a person being involved in the permissible work that does not involve anything haraam, but he has to avoid the haraam work and not participate in it in any way. If he fears that he will not be able to avoid the haraam elements, then what he must do is leave this job and look for permissible work that does not involve anything haraam. 

The scholars of the Standing Committee for Issuing Fatwas were asked: 

I have an opportunity to work in an accounting and financial auditing office, which – among its ordinary work – reviews and audits the accounts of insurance companies and banks, both those that deal with riba and those that do not. They also supervise the accounts of nightclubs and tourist hotel companies. Is it Islamically permissible for me to apply for a job there, which will give me a monthly salary? Please note that my qualifications are appropriate for this job. 

Please note: I know that the work of these offices is not limited to insurance companies, riba-based banks, tourism companies and nightclubs; rather they also supervise the accounts of commercial investment companies and of dignified professions such as doctors, engineers, teachers and artisans. Therefore I hope that you can answer my questions so as to put my mind at rest. 

They replied: 

If the situation of the office in which you want to work is as you describe, that it reviews and audits the accounts of insurance companies and riba-based banks, and supervises the accounts of nightclubs, then it is not permissible for you to work for them on these matters, because working on these things comes under the heading of cooperating with their owners in sin and transgression. Allah, may He be exalted, says (interpretation of the meaning): but do not help one another in sin and transgression” [al-Maa’idah 5:2]

But if your work will be in areas other than those mentioned, namely permissible things such as the accounts of those who practice dignified professions and doctors, then there is nothing wrong with that. However it is better to keep away from that, for fear of participating in the haraam activities mentioned above. End quote. 

Shaykh ‘Abd al-‘Azeez ibn Baaz, Shaykh ‘Abd ar-Razaaq ‘Afeefi, Shaykh ‘Abdullah ibn Ghadyaan, Shaykh ‘Abdullah ibn Qa‘ood 

Fataawa al-Lajnah ad-Daa’imah (15/6, 7) 

And Allah knows best.

Islam Q&A


Ruling on taking part in building a resort village
I work as a civil engineer in a company that takes on major contracts. The company has asked me to travel to a large resort city to build a resort village there. What is the ruling on that? Please note that I will lose my job if I refuse. May Allaah reward you with good.
Praise be to Allaah.  

It is well known that building a resort village involves a number of things that go against sharee’ah, such as making it easy for people to indulge in mixing, wanton display, unveiling, nakedness, alcohol, riba (usury) and many other things that are known to those who work in this area. 

The resort villages in your country, especially in the area mentioned, are well known for the many haraam things that go on there.  

As that is the case, taking part in building these resorts or helping in that comes under the heading of cooperating in sin and transgression. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“Help you one another in Al‑Birr and At‑Taqwa (virtue, righteousness and piety); but do not help one another in sin and transgression”

[al-Maa'idah 5:2] 

If a person sits with those who are committing sin and does not condemn it, then he bears the same burden of sin as they do, just for sitting with them. Similarly the one who sits with those who mock the signs (or verses) of Allaah bears the same burden of sin as they do, even if he does not mock with them, as Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):  

“And it has already been revealed to you in the Book (this Qur’aan) that when you hear the Verses of Allaah being denied and mocked at, then sit not with them, until they engage in a talk other than that; (but if you stayed with them) certainly in that case you would be like them. Surely, Allaah will collect the hypocrites and disbelievers all together in Hell”

[al-Nisa’ 4:140] 

If this is the case of one who sits with them, then how about one who helps them to build the houses in which they will commit evil and disobey Allaah, or houses in which they will mock the signs of Allaah and so on! 

You have to advise your bosses that what they are doing is haraam, and that they are partners in sin. If they do not respond, then excuse yourself from doing this work for any reason. For example, you could ask them to transfer you to another site where something permissible is being built, or you could say that it is too far away, or you could take an official holiday. 

If you cannot do that – but we do not think that the matter will go that far, in sha Allaah – then look for another job. I ask Allaah to help you to do the right things, for the burdens of this world are lighter than the punishment of the Hereafter.

And Allaah knows best.

Islam Q&A


Travelling for the purpose of mere tourism is haraam
What is the ruling on traveling to kaafir countries as a tourist, and taking pictures of the women in one’s family on these trips?

Praise be to Allaah.

Taking pictures of women is not permitted at all, because of the temptation and evil that results from that, in addition to the fact that taking pictures is forbidden in and of itself. So it is not permissible to take pictures of women when traveling or for any other reason. The Council of Senior Scholars has issued a statement that this is haraam. With regard to traveling to kaafir countries or permissive countries, this is not permitted because it involves temptation and evil, and mixing with the kaafirs, and seeing evil things and being affected by that. It is only permitted within strict guidelines which have been set out by the scholars, namely:

1-     For necessary medical treatment which cannot be found in any Muslim country

2-     For business purposes which require travel

3-     To learn knowledge which the Muslims need and which cannot be found in their countries

4-     To call people to Allaah and spread Islam

In each of these cases, there is the condition that the traveler should be able to practise his religion openly and show pride in his beliefs, and keep away from places of temptation.

With regard to traveling solely for the purpose of a pleasure trip, or for a break, this is emphatically forbidden. I ask Allaah to make me, you and all the Muslims adhere to that which He loves and which pleases Him. May Allaah bless our Prophet Muhammad and his family and companions.

Shaykh Saalih ibn Fawzaan al-Fawzaan, member of the Council of Senior Scholars and of the Standing Committee for Issuing Fatwas


Travelling to a land in which evil is widespread
What is the ruling on travelling to an Arab Muslim land where evil and haraam things are widespread? Many newly-weds travel to that country for a holiday or to spend their honeymoon there. What is required of one who travels to that country?
Praise be to Allaah. 

Firstly: 

In the answer to question no. (67587), we have stated what people call the honeymoon is one of the reprehensible habits that have become widespread among the Muslims, which has led to a great deal of negative consequences that can harm both spouses.  

Secondly: 

With regard to travelling to a country where evil and haraam things are widespread, that is haraam and it is not permissible to travel unless that is for an essential need. Travel for a holiday or for fun is not an essential need that would make it permissible to do this haraam action. 

Travelling to a land in which sin and evil are widespread, whether it is a Muslim country or not, involves many dangers and haraam actions, including the following: 

1 – Sitting in places of entertainment where sins are committed such as drinking alcohol and gambling, entering places of entertainment and dance halls, and not condemning those who do that. This is doing a haraam action and failing to do an obligatory action, whereby the Muslim is guilty of sin. 

2 – Loss of modesty because of the tempting scenes and immoral conduct and animalistic behaviour that one sees in those countries. 

Shaykh ‘Abd-Allaah ibn ‘Abd al-Rahmaan al-Jibreen mentioned a number of these evils and things that go against Islam in his answer when he was asked about the phenomenon of families travelling to Arab and western countries: 

He replied: 

There are many ahaadeeth which forbid the making of images… they are general in meaning and apply to all images, whether they are engraved, carved or drawn, and whether they are three-dimensional or have no shadow (two-dimensional). There is the command to erase all images, and it is narrated that the angels do not enter any house in which there is an image. Because of the necessity nowadays to protect borders and rights, the shaykhs and scholars have granted a concession with regard to necessities such as ID documents and passports etc, for those who want to travel for the sake of medical treatment or for essential studies and the like. Such a person may have his picture taken for his passport because it is not possible to travel otherwise. But as for travelling for the sake of pleasure or fun, this is not essential. I think that taking photographs is not permissible for this purpose. Travelling with one’s wife and family for pleasure and fun leads to many negative consequences, foremost among which is taking pictures of mahrams whereby men at the border posts see them even though it is haraam for a woman to uncover her face in front of non-mahram men. 

Secondly:  

There is no benefit in these journeys at all, rather they are a waste of precious time. The claim that these trips are for discovery and learning about other countries and their benefits are not true. Those who travel do not use their trips to learn and ponder; rather they use them to relax and enjoy looking at different scenes.  

Thirdly:  

These trips are a waste of money which is spent by these travellers and which goes to benefit the kuffaar who are the enemies of Islam and use it to support kufr, promote false religions and wage war against Islam and the Muslims. 

Fourthly: 

They indulge in permissible things which distract them from acts of worship, and they may do many makrooh things which lead them into haraam things. We often hear that those travellers intend to do promiscuous things, then they fall into zina, drinking alcohol, listening to music, going to dance halls and places of entertainment and spending huge amounts of money on those haraam and makrooh things, which benefits the kuffaar and harms the Muslims. 

Fifthly: 

The believing women end up doing things that are contrary to Islam, by lifting the veil of modesty, uncovering their faces and heads, showing their adornment and imitating the kaafir women on the grounds that they cannot cover among women who are uncovered. Thus they fall into sin and imitate the kaafir women and sinful women, and their guardians cannot stop them. 

Sixthly: 

Travelling to those countries for no necessary reasons is a means of committing sin or looking down on the Muslims, whereby one scorns the teachings of Islam and develops respect for the kuffaar in one's heart. We advise Muslims to protect themselves, their minds, their womenfolk, their wealth, their religious commitment and their worldly interests by not travelling except in cases of urgent need. 

And Allaah is the Source of strength and the Guide to the straight path. May Allaah send blessings and peace upon Muhammad and his family and companions. End quote. 

Shaykh Saalih ibn Fawzaan al-Fawzaan was asked a number of questions about young men travelling with their wives after getting married or during holidays, and the attitude of guardians about young women travelling with their husbands. There follow some of these questions and his answers: 

1 – If a father knows that his son is going to travel abroad after getting married, is he obliged to stop him? What is the evidence for that? 

Answer: The father should stop his son from travelling abroad if the journey is merely for pleasure and if he is able to stop him, because of the harm that travelling will do to his religious commitment and to him. If he cannot stop him, then he has to advise him and not give him any money for that, because that would be helping him in sin and transgression. 

2 – If the father of the wife knows that his daughter’s husband is going to take her on a trip abroad after they get married, is he obliged to stop her? Is she obliged to obey her father and not travel, or should she obey her husband and travel abroad for pleasure? 

Answer: The wife’s father has the right to prevent her from travelling abroad with her husband if the trip is merely for pleasure. The wife should not obey her husband in that, because there is no obedience to any created being if it involves disobedience towards the Creator. 

Thirdly: 

With regard to what is required of the one who travels to that country: if his trip is for a necessary purpose which makes it permissible, such as medical treatment and the like, then Shaykh Saalih al-Fawzaan said: 

My advice to those who travel abroad for permissible purposes is that they should fear Allaah and adhere to their religion and practise it openly; they should feel proud of it and call others to it and convey its message to the people. They should be a good example and represent the Muslims in a good light, and they should not remain in the kaafir land for longer than is necessary. End quote.

Islam Q&A


Ruling on travelling for fun (tourism)
Will I earn any reward if I take my family to a Muslim country for fun and relaxation?.
Praise be to Allaah.

It is permissible to travel to Muslim countries that are ruled by sharee’ah if they are free of evils and immorality. If the people of a country are Muslim but it is not ruled by sharee’ah, then we should not travel there for fun. It is even more haraam to go to countries whose people are kaafirs, and it is not permissible to travel to these countries except in case of need, such as a sick person who travels for treatment or with a sound purpose such as going for business or da’wah. 

Shaykh Saalih al-Fawzaan (may Allaah preserve him) was asked about the ruling on travelling to a country whose religion is something other than Islam, whether it is Christian or has no religion. Is there any difference between travelling for fun or travelling for medical treatment or study and so on? 

He replied: 

It is not permissible to travel to the lands of kufr, because this poses a threat to one’s ‘aqeedah and morals and because it involves mixing with the kuffaar and living among them. But if there is a need for travelling to their countries, such as seeking medical treatment for one who is sick that is not available anywhere else, or travelling for the purpose of study that is not available in a Muslim country, or travelling for business, these are valid purposes for which it is permissible to travel to kaafir countries, so long as one is able to adhere to Islamic practices and establish Islam in their lands. That should also be done only to the extent that it is necessary, then you should go back to the Muslim lands. 

Travelling for the sake of tourism is not permissible, because the Muslim has no need for that and it does not serve any interest that matches or outweighs the harm and danger that it poses to his religious commitment and ‘aqeedah. 

He was also asked: 

What is the ruling on travelling to Islamic lands in which there are a great deal of evils and major sins, such as zina and alcohol, and the like? 

He replied: 

What is meant by Islamic lands is those which are ruled according to Islamic sharee’ah, not the lands in which there are Muslims but they are not ruled according to sharee’ah. These are not Islamic. If there is corruption and evil in the lands that are Islamic in the former sense, then we should not travel to them, lest we be affected by the evil that exists there. As for the other type of lands – i.e., non-Islamic (not governed by sharee’ah), we have explained the ruling on travelling to them in the first question. 

And he was asked: 

What is your advice to fathers who send their children abroad during the summer to study English or for tourism? What is your advice to those who travel abroad? 

He replied: 

My advice to those fathers is that they should fear Allaah with regard to their children, for they are a trust concerning which they will be asked on the Day of Resurrection. It is not permissible for them to put their children at risk by sending them to the lands of kufr and corruption, lest they go astray. As for learning English – if it is really necessary – they can be taught it in their own country, without travelling to a kaafir country. Even more serious than that is sending them for the sake of tourism. Travelling for this purpose is haraam as stated in the first answer. 

My advice to those who travel abroad for whom it is Islamically permissible to travel, is that they should fear Allaah and adhere to their religion, practising it openly, feeling proud of it, calling people to it and conveying it to the people. They should be a good example, representing the Muslims well. And they should not stay in the kaafir land any longer than is necessary. And Allaah knows best. 

Al-Muntaqa, 2/253-255 

Shaykh Muhammad ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him) was asked about families travelling abroad, i.e., to other Muslim countries, knowing that there are passports involved and they look at the pictures of the women, and a man may ask a woman to uncover her face in order to prove her identity. Is that permissible other than in cases of necessity? 

He replied: 

Firstly: 

We do not think that anyone should travel abroad except in cases of necessity or for a valid purpose, because travelling abroad causes a great deal of unnecessary expense, so it is a waste of money and the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) forbade wasting money. 

Secondly: this travelling may distract them from doing things that they could be doing in their own country, such as upholding the ties of kinship, seeking knowledge, etc. Undoubtedly being distracted from something beneficial is to be regarded as a loss. 

Thirdly: The land to which they travel may be a land that has been influenced greatly by colonialism with regard to morality and ideas, which may affect his morals and way of thinking. This is the worst thing that is to be feared from travelling abroad. 

Hence I say to this questioner and to others: Praise be to Allaah, we have summer resorts in our country and there is no need to go abroad; that is also cheaper and benefits our fellow-citizens. 

Liqa’ al-Baab il-Maftooh, question no. 810. 

See also the answer to question no. 13342

And Allaah knows best.

Islam Q&A


Travel and tourism (siyaahah) in Islam – rulings and types
I hope that you can provide me with important and comprehensive information about Islamic tourism (siyaahah), or what is tourism in Islam, or what are the guidelines on tourism in Islam, or how we may develop Islamic tourism, or how we can develop a centre for Islamic tourism, or what would constitute Islamic tourism projects?.
Praise be to Allaah.  

Siyaahah (travel and/or tourism) may mean many things, but in modern usage it is limited to a few meanings, which indicate moving about in the land for fun or to look at things, research and find out, and so on; not to earn money, work or settle there. 

See: al-Mu’jam al-Waseet (469). 

When discussing tourism from the point of view of Islamic sharee’ah, we must look at the following categories: 

Firstly: 

The concept of siyaahah in Islam 

Islam came to change many of the distorted concepts that are held by imperfect human minds, and to connect them to the most sublime and honourable values and morals. In the minds of earlier nations, siyaahah was connected to the concept of self-punishment and forcing oneself to travel through the land, and exhausting the body as a punishment for it or as a way of shunning this world. Islam abolished this negative concept of siyaahah. 

Ibn Haani’ narrated that Ahmad ibn Hanbal was asked: Is a man who travels about dearer to you, or one who stays in his city? He said: Siyaahah has nothing to do with Islam, and it is not the action of the Prophets or the righteous. 

Talbees Iblees (340). 

Ibn Rajab al-Hanbali commented on the words of Imam Ahmad by saying: 

Siyaahah in this sense was done by some groups who are known to strive in worship without knowledge; some of them gave up this activity when they realized that it was not right. 

Fath al-Baari by Ibn Rajab (1/56). 

Islam came to elevate the concept of siyaahah, and to connect it to great and noble aims, such as the following: 

1.     Connecting siyaahah to worship. So travel – or siyaahah – is enjoined in order to perform one of the pillars of Islam, namely Hajj during certain months, and ‘umrah to the House of Allaah is prescribed throughout the year. When a man came to the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and asked him for permission for siyaahah (in the ancient sense of travelling as an act of asceticism or self-punishment only), the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) guided him to something that is more sublime and better than siyaahah. He said to him: “The siyaahah of my ummah is jihad for the sake of Allaah.” Narrated by Abu Dawood (2486); classed as hasan by al-Albaani in Saheeh Abi Dawood; its isnaad was classed as jayyid by al-‘Iraaqi in Takhreej Ihya’ ‘Uloom al-Deen (2641). Think about how the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) made a connection between the kind of siyaahah that is encouraged in sharee’ah and a great and noble aim.   

2.     In the Islamic worldview, siyaahah is also connected to knowledge and learning. The greatest journeys were undertaken at the beginning of Islam with the aim of seeking and spreading knowledge. al-Khateeb al-Baghdadi wrote a famous book called al-Rihlah fi Talab al-Hadeeth (Travelling to seek hadeeth) in which he compiled the names of those who travelled for the sake of a single hadeeth. For example one of the Taabi’een said concerning the verse in which Allaah says: 

“(The believers whose lives Allaah has purchased are) those who turn to Allaah in repentance (from polytheism and hypocrisy), who worship (Him), who praise (Him), who fast (or go out in Allaah’s Cause), who bow down (in prayer), who prostrate themselves (in prayer), who enjoin (on people) Al‑Ma‘roof and forbid (people) from Al‑Munkar, and who observe the limits set by Allaah. And give glad tidings to the believers”

[al-Tawbah 9:112] 

‘Ikrimah said: al-saa’ihoon (translated here as who fast (or go out in Allaah’s Cause)) are the seekers of knowledge. 

This was narrated by Ibn Abi Haatim in his Tafseer (7/429). See also Fath al-Qadeer (2/408). 

Although the correct meaning according to the majority of the salaf is that what is meant by al-saa’ihoon is those who fast. 

3.     Another of the aims of siyaahah in Islam is to learn lessons and receive reminders. The command to travel about in the land appears in several places in the Qur’aan. Allaah says: 

“Say (O Muhammad صلى الله عليه وسلم): Travel in the land and see what was the end of those who rejected truth”

[al-An’aam 6:11] 

“Say to them (O Muhammad صلى الله عليه وسلم): “Travel in the land and see how has been the end of the Mujrimoon (criminals, those who denied Allaah’s Messengers and disobeyed Allaah)”

[al-Naml 27:69] 

al-Qaasimi (may Allaah have mercy on him) said they are the ones who go to different places to study the ruins and learn a lesson from them and seek other benefits. 

Mahaasin al-Ta’weel (16/225). 

4.     Maybe the greatest aim of siyaahah in Islam is to call people to Allaah and to convey to mankind the light that was revealed to our Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him). This is the mission of the Messengers and Prophets and their companions after them (may Allaah be pleased with them). The companions of our Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) spread throughout the world, teaching the people goodness and calling them to the message of truth. We hope that the concept of siyaahah today will try to achieve the same great aims.  

5.     Finally, siyaahah in Islam also includes travelling to ponder the wonders of Allaah’s creation and to enjoy the beauty of this great universe, so that it will make the human soul develop strong faith in the oneness of Allaah and will help one to fulfil the obligations of life. Relaxation is essential to enable one to strive hard after that. 

Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“Say: Travel in the land and see how (Allaah) originated the creation, and then Allaah will bring forth the creation of the Hereafter (i.e. resurrection after death). Verily, Allaah is Able to do all things”

[al-‘Ankaboot 29:20] 

Secondly: 

Guidelines on the type of siyaahah (tourism) that is acceptable in Islam. 

Islamic sharee’ah has brought a number of rulings that regulate siyaahah so that it will achieve the aims mentioned above and will not overstep the mark or become a source of evil and harm in society. These rulings include the following: 

1.     It is haraam to travel for the purpose of venerating a specific place, except the three mosques. 

It was narrated from Abu Hurayrah (may Allaah be pleased with him) that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “No journey should be undertaken to visit any mosque but three: al-Masjid al-Haraam, the Mosque of the Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and the Mosque of al-Aqsa.” Narrated by al-Bukhaari (1132) and Muslim (1397). 

This hadeeth indicates that it is haraam to undertake “religious journeys”, as they are called, to any mosque other than these three, such as those who call for travelling to visit graves or mashhads (shrines) or tombs or mausoleums, especially those tombs that are venerated by people and from which they seek blessing, and they commit all kinds of shirk and haraam actions there. There is nothing in sharee’ah to suggest that places are sacred and that acts of worship should be done in them apart from these three mosques.  

It was narrated that Abu Hurayrah (may Allaah be pleased with him) said: I went out to al-Toor (Sinai) where I met Ka’b al-Ahbaar and sat with him … He mentioned a lengthy hadeeth then he said: Then I met Basrah ibn Abi Basrah al-Ghifaari who said: From where have you come? I said: From Sinai. He said: If I had met you before you went out, you would not have gone to that place. I heard the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) say: “Mounts are not to be ridden except to three mosques: al-Masjid al-Haraam, this mosque of mine and the mosque of Eeliya’ or Bayt al-Maqdis [Jerusalem].” 

Narrated by Maalik in al-Muwatta’ (108) and al-Nasaa’i (1430). Classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in Saheeh al-Nasaa’i

So it is not permissible to travel with the aim of visiting any holy place except these three. This does not mean that it is haraam to visit mosques in Muslim lands, because visiting them is prescribed and is mustahabb. Rather what is forbidden is setting out with that aim. If a person has another reason for travelling, and he happens to visit the mosque too, there is nothing wrong with that, rather he is obliged to pray Jumu’ah and prayers in congregation. 

It is even more haraam to travel to visit places that are regarded as holy in other religions, such as those who go to visit the Vatican or Buddhist idols and so on. 

2.     The evidence also indicates that it is haraam for the Muslim to travel in kaafir lands in general, because of the evils that will affect the Muslim’s religious commitment and attitude as the result of mixing with those nations who pay no attention to religion and morals, especially when there is no need for him to travel for medical treatment or business and so on, rather it is just for leisure and for fun. Allaah has made the Muslim lands spacious, praise be to Allaah, and He has placed therein wonders of creation so that there is no need to visit the kaafirs in their lands. 

Shaykh Saalih al-Fawzaan (may Allaah preserve him) said:  

Travelling to kaafir lands is not permissible, because there are many dangers posed to one’s beliefs and morals by mixing with the kuffaar and staying among them. But if there is a valid need and a sound purpose for travelling, such as travelling for medical treatment that is not available in a Muslim country, or travelling to study something that is not available in a Muslim country, or travelling for business purposes, these are valid purposes for which it is permissible to travel to kaafir countries, provided that one adheres to the rituals of Islam and is able to carry out his religious duties in that country, but that (travel) should be done only as much as is necessary, then one should return to the Muslim world. 

As for travelling for tourism, that is not permissible, because the Muslim has no need of that and it does not serve any interest that matches or outweighs the harm and danger to his religious commitment and beliefs that it involves. 

Al-Muntaqa min Fataawa al-Shaykh al-Fawzaan (2/question no. 221) 

We have already discussed this question in detail and at length on our site. Please see the answers to question no. 52845, 8919 and 13342

3.     There can be no doubt that sharee’ah forbids tourism in places of corruption, where alcohol is drunk and immoral actions take place and sins are committed, such as beaches and parties and immoral places, or travelling to hold celebrations on innovated festivals. The Muslim is enjoined to keep away from sin so he should not commit sin or sit with those who are committing sin. 

The scholars of the Standing Committee said: 

It is not permissible to go to places of corruption for the sake of tourism, because of the danger that poses to one’s religious commitment and morals. Islam came to block the means that lead to evil. 

Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah (26/332). 

So how about tourism that encourages sin and immorality, and is organized in order to promote it and spread it? 

The scholars of the Standing Committee also said: 

If this tourism involves making it easy to commit sin and evils, and promotes them, then it is not permissible for the Muslim who believes in Allaah and the Last Day to help others to disobey Allaah and go against His commands. If a person gives up something for the sake of Allaah, Allaah will compensate him with something better than it. 

Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah (26/224). 

4.     With regard to visiting the ruins and places of former nations, if they are places of punishment where they were swallowed up by the earth, transformed or destroyed because of their disbelief in Allaah, then it is not permissible to take those places as sites for tourism and recreation. 

The scholars of the Standing Committee were asked: 

In the city of al-Bada’, near Tabook, there is an area where there are ancient ruins and houses carved out of the mountains, and some people say that these were the dwellings of the people of Shu’ayb (peace be upon him). My question is: Has it been proven that these were the dwellings of the people of Shu’ayb (peace be upon him) or not? What is the ruling on visiting these ruins for one whose aim is to have a look at them, and the one whose aim is to ponder and learn a lesson? 

They replied: 

It is well known among the scholars that the houses of Madyan to whom the Prophet of Allaah Shu’ayb (peace be upon him) was sent were in the north-west of the Arabian Peninsula, which is now known as al-Bada’ and its environs.  

Allaah knows best what is really true. If this is correct, then it is not permissible to visit those places for the purpose of having a look at them, because when the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) passed though al-Hijr – which was where the houses of Thamood were – he said: “Do not enter the dwellings of those who wronged themselves unless you are weeping, lest there befall you something like that which befell them.” Then he covered his head and urged his mount to move on quickly until he left the place behind.

Narrated by al-Bukhaari (3200) and Muslim (2980). 

Ibn al-Qayyim (may Allaah have mercy on him) said, whilst listing the lessons and rulings learned from the campaign to Tabook: 

One who passes by the places of those who were subjected to divine wrath or who were punished should not enter them or stay among them, rather he should hasten to move on and should cover his head with his garment until he has passed them, and he should not enter upon them unless he is weeping and willing to learn a lesson. An example of this is when the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) hastened to move on in the valley of Muhsir, between Mina and Muzdalifah, because it was the place where Allaah destroyed the elephant and its companions. 

Zaad al-Ma’aad (3/560). 

Al-Haafiz Ibn Hajar (may Allaah have mercy on him) said, commenting on the hadeeth quoted above: 

This applies to the dwellings of Thamood and others like them, though the reason was given concerning them. 

Fath al-Baari (6/380). 

See: Majmoo’at Abhaath Hay’at Kibaar al-‘Ulama’ fi’l-Mamlakat al-‘Arabiyyah al-Sa’oodiyyah, vol. 3, essay entitled Hukm Ihya’ Diyaar Thamood

See also the answer to question no. 20894

5 – It is also not permissible for a woman to travel without a mahram. The scholars have stated that it is haraam for a woman to travel without a mahram for Hajj or ‘umrah, so how about if the travel is for the purpose of tourism which involves a lot of carelessness and haraam mixing?! 

See the answers to questions no. 3098, 69337, 45917 and 4523

6 – As for organizing trips for kuffaar in Muslim countries, the basic principle is that it is permissible. If a kaafir tourist is granted permission by a Muslim state to enter, then he is granted safety until he leaves. But during his stay in the Muslim country he should be required to show respect for the Islamic religion and the morals and culture of the Muslims; he should not call people to his religion or claim that Islam is false, and he should only go out in clothes that are appropriate for a Muslim country, not as they are accustomed to dress in their country, semi naked and decadent. He should not be a helper or spy for his people. And finally the kuffaar should not be allowed to visit the two Holy Sanctuaries in Makkah and Madeenah al-Munawwarah. 

Thirdly: 

It is obvious to everyone that tourism (siyaahah) nowadays mostly involves sin, immoral deeds and transgression of the sacred limits, such as deliberate wanton display and nakedness, permissive mixing, drinking of alcohol, promotion of corruption, imitation of the kuffaar and introduction of their customs and ways, and even their diseases, let alone a waste of money, time and effort. All of that happens in the name of tourism. We remind everyone who is concerned about his religion, morals and ummah not to help to promote this evil kind of tourism; rather he should fight it and fight against the culture that it promotes; he should be proud of his religion, culture and morals, for they will protect him against all evils, and give him an alternative in the conservative Muslim lands.  

And Allaah knows best.

Islam Q&A


Ruling on building tourist resorts and taking part in that
What is the ruling on establishing a contracting company for building tourist resorts on the coast, where the visitors will be foreign tourists as well as locals, and in which there will be a lot of haraam things, such as nakedness, alcohol and immorality, and in which there will also be permissible things, such as supermarkets and medical clinics etc?.
Praise be to Allaah.

Allaah has forbidden people to disobey Him, and He has forbidden them to co-operate in disobedience. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“Help you one another in Al‑Birr and At‑Taqwa (virtue, righteousness and piety); but do not help one another in sin and transgression”

[al-Maa’idah 5:2] 

These tourist resorts and villages -- unfortunately -- have become venues for kaafirs and immoral people, who do not respect the sacred limits of Allaah and have no fear of Him, and they do not venerate Allaah as He deserves to be venerated. 

In these resorts there is nakedness and places of entertainment in which there is dancing, permissiveness, immorality, open consumption of alcohol and, in some of them, there may be places for gambling (casinos). 

All of these are haraam things; indeed, they are major sins. 

It is not permissible for the one who believes in Allaah and the Last Day to do these things, and it is not permissible for him to take part in them or to help those who are doing them. 

All kinds of sins are committed in these resorts; the one who built them or helps to establish them or helps to keep them running, has a share of the sin involved. 

Even the permissible places in them, such as medical clinics, supermarkets, parking lots, laundromats and so on, are only built to make it easier for the sinners to commit sin, so they are not free of sin either. 

The scholars of the Standing Committee for Issuing Fatwas were asked: 

I work for an Arab building and development company (private sector). Currently the company is building a tourist resort called -----. It is building villas, apartments and chalets. It is located on the coast on the outskirts of -----. This resort has been built to be used as a summer resort for local tourists. Please note that it is located in among other similar resorts, or more correctly, the entire coastal region in ----- is used as summer resorts. The people in our country who use these places in the summer only do not adhere to sharee’ah at all, and immodesty is a deeply rooted characteristic among them, to such an extent that they bathe in the sea in what is called bathing suits, men and women alike. Please note that the region of ----- is remote and the people there are more promiscuous and more disobedient to Allaah the Lord of the Worlds. 

My questions are: 

1.     What is the ruling on building resorts or villages like this, as it has become very common.

2.     What is the ruling on those who work for these companies? Please note that the company has other projects in the country.

3.     What is the ruling on those who work on the building site, whether as engineers, contractors or employees?

4.     What is the ruling on the architects who design resorts such as these? 

They replied: 

Firstly: if the situation is as described, it is haraam to build these resorts, because that is enabling the evildoers to do evil, and is cooperating with them in spreading it. 

Secondly: it is not permissible for the Muslim to work for these companies in building these houses or facilities, whether he is a contractor, an engineer who is supervising the project, a designer, a construction worker, a manager, or an accountant, and so on, because that is cooperating in sin and transgression, and spreading evil and corruption. End quote. 

Shaykh ‘Abd al-‘Azeez ibn Baaz, Shaykh ‘Abd al-Razzaaq ‘Afeefi, Shaykh ‘Abd-Allaah ibn Ghadyaan, Shaykh ‘Abd-Allaah ibn Qa’ood. 

Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah, 14/440, 441


Ruling on working in the tourism field as a booking agent
What is the ruling on working in a tourism company or an airline company booking airplane tickets or making reservations on ships? What is the ruling on working as a tourist guide? Please note that I am a graduate of the college of tourism and hotel management.
Praise be to Allaah.

Firstly: 

There is nothing wrong with working in an office booking plane tickets or reservations on ships, if that does not involve helping in evildoing. Helping in evildoing includes selling tickets to one who it is known or thought most likely that he is travelling for haraam purposes, such as one who takes his family to a kaafir country for tourism and leisure, or one who goes to places of corruption such as resorts and tourist areas which are not free of all evils and corruption, such as mixing between men and women, consumption of intoxicants and haraam things, and so on, because Allaah says (interpretation meaning):

“Help you one another in Al‑Birr and At‑Taqwa (virtue, righteousness and piety); but do not help one another in sin and transgression. And fear Allaah. Verily, Allaah is Severe in punishment”

[al-Maa’idah 5:2] 

Secondly:

It is well-known that tourism, as it is known nowadays, it is not free of things that incur punishment and major sins, such as drinking alcohol, nakedness, promiscuity, spread of immorality, neglecting prayers … and all the other evils which have been seen and are known about by everyone who hears about tourism. But if we could say that tourism was free of such evils, then our words would be theoretical and we would be speaking about some other kind of tourism that is different to that which people know and see nowadays. 

There is no doubt that working in this field is cooperating in sin and transgression, and inclination towards immoral people and evildoers, and towards the people of sin. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“And incline not toward those who do wrong, lest the Fire should touch you, and you have no protectors other than Allaah, nor you would then be helped”

[Hood 11:113]

Shaykh al-Sa’di (may Allaah have mercy on him) said:

And incline not toward those who do wrong” because, if you incline toward them and join them in their wrongdoing or approve of their wrongdoing, “the Fire [will] touch you”, if you do that, “and you [will] have no protectors other than Allaah” to protect you from the punishment of Allaah, and they will not bring you anything of the reward of Allaah. “nor [would you] then be helped” i.e., the punishment would not be warded off from you if it touched you. This verse is a warning against inclining towards any wrongdoer or joining him in his wrongdoing or approving of the wrong that he is doing. 

If this warning has to do with inclining towards wrongdoing, then what about the wrongdoers themselves? We ask Allaah to keep us safe and sound from wrongdoing. End quote. Tafseer al-Sa’di (290). 

Moreover, tourism is based on moving between archaeological places which attract tourists, such as the dwellings of Thamood and Pharaonic temples and tombs, but these are places of punishment and curses and it is not permissible to enter them or visit them. 

It was narrated from Ibn ‘Umar (may Allaah be pleased with him) that when the Prophet (blessings and peace of Allaah be upon him) passed by al-Hijr, he said: “Do not enter the dwellings of those who wronged themselves unless you are weeping, lest there befall you what befell them.” Then he covered his face with his upper garment (rida’) while he was on the camel saddle. Agreed upon. 

Al-Nawawi (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: 

This shows that we are encouraged to be alert when passing by the dwellings of the wrongdoers and places where punishment came down. A similar example is hastening when passing through Wadi Muhassir, because the companions of the elephant were destroyed there. The person who passes through such places should be alert, feel a sense of fear, weep, and learn a lesson from them and the places where they met their doom, and he should seek refuge with Allaah from that. End quote. 

It says in Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah

At the end of your letter, you say that you are a tourism manager in your city. If this tourism includes facilitating the committing of sin and evil actions, and promoting them, then it is not permissible for a Muslim who believes in Allaah and the Last Day to be a helper in disobedience to Allaah and going against His commands. The one who gives up something for the sake of Allaah, Allaah will compensate him with something better than it. End quote. 

Fataawa al-Lajnah (26/224). 

The committee was also asked: 

What is the ruling on travelling to Arab and Muslim countries for the purpose of tourism? Please note that we do not go to entertainment venues.  

They replied: It is not permissible to travel to corrupt places for the sake of tourism, because of the danger that that poses to religious commitment and morals, because sharee’ah seeks to block the means that lead to evil. End quote.  

Fataawa al-Lajnah (26/331). 

Conclusion: 

It is not permissible to work in tourism or any other field which facilitates the aims of sinful people, or to approve of their sins and help them to commit them, or to refrain from denouncing them when one is able to. Rather the one who is unable to change an evil or denounce it, must shun its people and not keep company with them or show them the way to do it. 

Please see also the answer to question number 82402 and 125799

And Allaah knows best.

Islam Q&A


He drives a taxi and takes passengers to bars and night clubs
My husband drive a taxi in canada.he has to drop the customers to brs and night clubs and also sometime to pick them. is his income is halal?.
Praise be to Allaah.

It is haraam to go to bars where alcohol is sold, and night clubs which involve immoral and sinful things. It is not permissible to help anyone with regard to that, or to take him in his car for free or for payment, because that is helping in sin. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“Help you one another in Al‑Birr and At‑Taqwa (virtue, righteousness and piety); but do not help one another in sin and transgression. And fear Allaah. Verily, Allaah is Severe in punishment”

[al-Maa’idah 5:2] 

Based on that, if your husband knows that the passenger wants to go to a haraam place, it is not permissible for him to take him. 

Similarly, he should not wait for the people who are coming out of those haraam places, because that is facilitating their coming and going. But if one of them stops him and asks him to take him home or to some permissible place, he may take him there, because that does not involve what we have mentioned above about helping in sin. 

See also the answer to question no. 75443 and 10398 

And Allaah knows best.

Islam Q&A


Ruling on mediating in the sale of a tourist village
I have a chance to mediate in selling a ready-to-run tourism village. If it starts operating then tourists will come to it and they will be served alcohol and other foods and drinks. Is it permissible for me to mediate in this deal?.
Praise be to Allaah.

It is not permissible to mediate in the sale of a tourist village which it is known will be a place of evil, immorality and reprehensible actions such as zina, drinking alcohol, gambling, nakedness and other haraam things, because that is helping in sin and transgression. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“Help you one another in Al‑Birr and At‑Taqwa (virtue, righteousness and piety); but do not help one another in sin and transgression. And fear Allaah. Verily, Allaah is Severe in punishment”

[al-Maa’idah 5:2] 

And the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Whoever calls others to misguidance will bear a burden of sin like that of those who follow him, without it detracting from their burdens in the slightest.”

Narrated by Muslim in his Saheeh (4831). 

How can a Muslim agree to such villages, which are places of immorality and corruption, being established in his country or in any Muslim country, let alone helping to set them up or acting as an intermediary in their sale? Rather what he should do is denounce this evil and disavow it, and strive to change it and remove it. 

We have discussed the ruling on setting up such villages and taking part in their construction in the answer to question no. 82292 and 47513

You should note that whoever gives up something for the sake of Allaah, Allaah will compensate him with something better than it, and that this world is transient, as are its wealth and pleasures, but that which is with Allaah will abide forever.  

May Allah help us and you to acquire beneficial knowledge and do good deeds, and may He suffice us with that which He has permitted so that we will have no need of that which He has forbidden, and by His bounty so that we have no need of anyone but Him. 

And Allaah knows best.

Islam Q&A


Ruling on selling souvenirs for tourists
Is it permissible to deal in souvenirs for tourists?.
Praise be to Allaah.

It is permissible to deal in souvenirs for tourists, so long as that does not include anything haraam, because the basic principle is that selling is permissible, as Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“Allaah has permitted trading”

[al-Baqarah 2:275] 

So if the item being sold is not haraam and is not something that is used for haraam purposes, then there is nothing wrong with selling it or dealing in it. 

Haraam things include: selling alcohol, statues, clothing with images on them, and selling things that venerate the kuffaar such as their pictures, flags and symbols, or anything that helps them or evildoers to engage in their evil and falsehood, such as indecent clothing, greetings cards for haraam festivals and selling things which are proven to be harmful such as tobacco. 

For more information please see question no. 75007 and 67745 and 12274

And Allaah knows best.

Islam Q&A


Using a credit card from a British bank when travelling abroad
I have acquired the visa card of a British bank, and I did not know that it deals by interest. I have not acquired it except due to my need for it abroad. I will not use it but abroad. Is this permissible? May Allah reward you. I intend to cancel it if using it abroad is haram.
Praise be to Allaah.

There is nothing wrong with using a credit card if one avoids the following things which are haraam: 

1-    Stipulation of interest or a penalty in the event of late payment.

2-    Taking a percentage of the withdrawal fee if the credit card is not covered. It is permissible to charge a fee for the transaction only, but anything more than that is riba.

3-    Buying gold, silver or currency with a card that is not covered. 

It should be noted that most credit cards stipulate a penalty in the event of late payment, which is a riba-based, haraam condition; it is not permissible to agree to it or to enter into a contract that includes it, even if a person is confident that he will not delay payment, because it is haraam to approve of riba or commit oneself to it. 

Based on this, if the credit card asked about here is free of the haraam things mentioned, then there is nothing wrong with using it, but if it includes one of these haraam things, it is not permissible to use it. 

See also question no. 97530

And Allaah knows best.

Islam Q&A


Working in the construction and finishing of hotels and resorts
I am an architect and I work in the finishing of luxury hotels and resorts (that includes, for example, doors, ceramic tiles, marble, furniture, walls, bathrooms). A resort may contain 48 villas, as well as the head office, outbuildings, gardens etc. But I do not work in finishing the haraam places such as bars, discos and so on. Is this work halaal or haraam? If I go with the intention of learning – since I am a new graduate and this work needs a period of training and gaining experience and I do not have any training or experience – and I receive a salary, is it halaal or haraam? Does it make a difference whether the hotel is in the city or in the resort such as Sharm al-Sheikh and so on? For example, if there is a apartment in which there is a room for alcohol, should I finish the apartment apart from that room, or should I not finish the apartment at all?.
Praise be to Allaah.

We have already explained the ruling on taking part in building resorts which include free mixing, wanton display (tabarruj), immorality and alcohol, and we have stated that this is not permissible because it involves cooperating in sin and transgression. See the answer to question no. 47513

This is the basic principle on which such matters are based. Everything which involves cooperating in sin and transgression is haraam, and it is not permissible to work in the finishing or construction of a disco or place for drinking alcohol, or a gambling hall, or a dance hall. Taking part in such things is taking part in sin and transgression. Similarly it is not permissible to sell or rent out places that will be used for sinful purposes. 

It seems that there is a difference between hotels that are built in cities and those which are built in resorts. Hotels in cities are usually used as places to live or to stay in and rest; they are not intended for sinful purposes in most cases, unlike the hotels that are built in resorts, where it seems that those who travel to them do so for the sake of the immorality and deviation that exists therein. 

Similarly, if the apartment includes a room that is to be used for haraam purposes, such as drinking alcohol, then it is not permissible to help with building or finishing this room, but it is permissible with regard to the rest of it.                                         

You should note that there are many means of earning a halaal provision, and whoever gives up something for the sake of Allaah, Allaah will compensate him with something better than it. So be certain of that, and seek to please Allaah in all that you do, and beware of doubtful matters so that your religious commitment and honour will be safe.  

And Allaah knows best.

Islam Q&A


Should he accept his father’s money that was earned from haraam sources?
I hope you can advise me about this matter. I am a young man, twenty-one years old. I am studying in business college and my father works in tourism (in the private sector, in one of the resort cities). He is an electrical engineer and works in the village as the director of the engineering department, which means that he is responsible for everything that has to do with electricity, staring with light fixtures and ending with water pumps, and including refrigerators for storing wine, lights for dance halls, televisions, etc. He receives a high salary for this work, four thousand Egyptian pounds. 
As well as studying, I was also working in a restaurant – just because I liked the work, not because I needed to. When I wanted to become independent and start a small business of my own, I could not find anyone except my father from whom to take the money I needed. But I was not sure as to whether my father’s money is halaal or haraam, so I consulted one of the shaykhs who are known to be of Ahl al-Sunnah, and he told me that as his money is mixed, it is not permissible for me to take anything of it except for essential things such as food, drink, clothing and tuition fees. As for what I need as capital to start my own business, it is permissible to take it from him as a loan. But now my father wants to help me as a father, and work alongside me in the store. Sometimes I would leave the store to him and go and take care of the store’s needs and my own needs. In this way my father started to learn about my work and was able to run the store by himself. This is where the first problem arises … I used to keep precise records of what I took from my father, but since he joined me in the store, things have become mixed up. My father sometimes takes money from his own pocket and puts it in the till, or buys goods for the store from his own pocket. This can be kept track of with a great deal of effort, but what I cannot keep track of is the fact that he may buy food for the house, then he finds that the store needs it, so he brings some of what he bought for the house and puts it in the store, without my knowledge and without consulting me, and without telling me how much it cost so I can repay him. 
The second problem is that he is not happy with the idea of my returning the money to him, he regards it as my money and my brothers’ money, and he is working and bringing this money for us, so he will never accept the money being returned to him. 
The third problem is that he is not convinced that his money is haraam – if it is haraam. He thinks that it is the kind of “necessity which means that forbidden things are permitted” and his government job pays only 400 Egyptian pounds – not the difference. We are a family of five, two of whom are studying in university. He thinks that the wealth of the state is all haraam because the state deals with riba-based loans and imposes taxes and allows trade in alcohol, so everyone who works has some haraam element in his income.  My question now is: 
1- What is the ruling on my father’s wealth? Does the principle of “necessity which means that forbidden things are permitted” apply here? If that is the case, is it permissible for us to make use of his haraam earnings because he is looking after us?
2- How can I work out how much money my father has contributed to my business, when he himself does not know how much it is?
3- How can I return this money to him – if I have to return it – if he refuses to take it? Is it permissible for me to insist and to pay back the debts I owe to the people to whom it is owed?
4- What is permissible to me of my father’s wealth? If he dies, is it permissible for me to inherit his wealth?.
Praise be to Allaah.  

Undoubtedly working in the tourist industry as it exists at present, especially in your country, involves a lot of things that go against sharee’ah, such as mixing, tabarruj (wanton display of women), alcohol and other haraam things. As this is the case, part of your father’s wealth is haraam. This is what the scholars call mixed wealth. 

The scholars have stated that if a person has mixed wealth that includes both halaal and haraam, it is permissible to eat from his wealth and it is permissible to deal with him in all ways, but it is better to be cautious. 

With regard to your father claiming that this is a necessity, that is not correct, because there are many means of earning a halaal living. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“And whosoever fears Allaah and keeps his duty to Him, He will make a way for him to get out (from every difficulty).

3. And He will provide him from (sources) he never could imagine”

[al-Talaaq 65:2-3] 

If a person makes this claim, then soon he will claim that he can do all kinds of haraam things because of necessity. 

You should understand that there are severe consequences to consuming haraam wealth, even if that is only that one’s du’aa’s are not answered, as it says in Saheeh Muslim, that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Allaah is Good and only accepts that which is good…” and he mentioned a man who has been traveling for a long time and is unkempt and covered with dust, and he raises his hands to the heavens (and says), “O Lord, O Lord,” when his food is haraam, his drink is haraam, his clothes are haraam, and he is nourished with haraam, so how can he receive any response? Narrated by Muslim, no. 1015. 

The wealth that your father has acquired through the haraam job is described by the scholars as wealth that is haraam because of the way in which it was acquired, i.e., he earned it in a haraam manner. Some scholars are of the view that this wealth is haraam only for the one who earns it, but for the one who takes it from him in a permissible way, it is not haraam for him, such as if your father gives you a gift or spends on you and so on. 

Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen said: Some of the scholars said that in the case of wealth that is haraam because of the way in which it was acquired, the sin is only on the one who earned it, not on the one who takes it in a permissible way from the one who acquired it. This is unlike wealth that is haraam in and of itself, such as alcohol, wealth seized by force, and so on. This view has a strong basis, because the Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) bought food from the Jews for his family, and he ate from the lamb that the Jewish women gave him in Khaybar, and he accepted the invitation of a Jew, even though it is well known that most of the Jews consume riba and haraam wealth. Perhaps this view is further supported by the words of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) concerning the meat that was given in charity to Bareerah: “It is charity for her and a gift from her to us.” Al-Qawl al-Mufeed ‘ala Kitaab al-Tawheed, 3/112.  

Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen said: With regard to that which is haraam because of the way in which it is acquired, such as that which is taken by means of deceit, or by means of riba, or by means of lying and so on, this is haraam for the one who acquires it, but it is not haraam for anyone else if he acquires it from him in a permissible manner. This is indicated by the fact that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) used to deal with the Jews even though they used to consume haraam wealth and riba. This indicates that it is not haraam for anyone other than the one who acquired it. Tafseer Soorat al-Baqarah, 1/198. 

Based on this, then you can inherit from your father and you do not have to keep track of what he has contributed to your business, or return what he contributed, but if you are cautious about consuming any of his wealth as much as you can, that is better. And Allaah knows best. 

For more information, see Ahkaam al-Qur’aan by Ibn al-‘Arabi, 1/324; al-Majmoo’, 9/430; al-Fataawa al-Fiqhiyyah al-Kubra by al-Bayhaqi, 2/233; Kashshaaf al-Qinaa’, 3/496, question no. 21701.

Islam Q&A


Ruling on taking off hijaab when travelling abroad
What is the ruling on taking off hijaab and uncovering the face when traveling abroad in obedience to my mother’s demands, on the grounds that I attract unwelcome attention?

Praise be to Allaah.

It is not permissible for you or for any other woman to take off your hijaab in the kaafir countries, just as that is not permissible in any Muslim country. It is obligatory to observe hijaab in front of non-mahram males whether they are Muslims or kaafirs; indeed it is more obligatory in the case of kaafirs, because they have no faith to keep them from doing that which Allaah has forbidden. 

It is not permissible for you or any other woman to obey parents or anyone else in doing that which Allaah and His Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) have forbidden. Allaah says in Soorat al-Ahzaab (interpretation of the meaning): 

“And when you ask (his wives) for anything you want, ask them from behind a screen, that is purer for your hearts and for their hearts”

[al-Ahzaab 33:53] 

In this aayah Allaah explains that for women to observe hijaab and be screened from non-mahram men is purer for the hearts of everyone. And Allaah says in Soorat al-Noor (interpretation of the meaning): 

“And tell the believing women to lower their gaze (from looking at forbidden things), and protect their private parts (from illegal sexual acts) and not to show off their adornment except only that which is apparent (like both eyes for necessity to see the way, or outer palms of hands or one eye or dress like veil, gloves, headcover, apron), and to draw their veils all over Juyoobihinna (i.e. their bodies, faces, necks and bosoms) and not to reveal their adornment except to their husbands, or their fathers, or their husband’s fathers…”

[al-Noor 24:31] 

And the face is the greatest part of beauty or adornment. 

Shaykh ‘Abd al-‘Azeez ibn ‘Abd-Allaah ibn Baaz (may Allaah have mercy on him)from Al-Hisbah magazine, issue no. 39, p. 14


A taxi driver takes some people to haraam places
My question to you is that i am a student living in australia i also drive cabs part time i want to ask you brother that some times we have to leave passengers to bars,clubs,pubs,and some times to brothels and some times we have to pick them up also when we get a job from there is it haraam to do so? because we do not tell them to go there and we cannot refuse to take them if they ask us to take them there because of the taxi cab laws as you would know people catch cabs in the western world when they are going to drink or come back from home.what should the muslim cab drivers do so in this situation?

Praise be to Allaah. 

Undoubtedly this is considered to be co-operating in sin and transgression. We advise you not to take these people to brothels, places or corruption and bars. You will find other people. This applies whether you are taking them from these places or to them. Whoever fears Allaah and keeps his duty towards Him (taqwa), Allaah will grant him a way out, so look for other passengers from other places. If it so happens that you take on these passengers and you did not know that this is where they were headed, then we do not say that the fare is haraam for you, because it is compensation for your efforts, or for the use of your car.

Shaykh ‘Abd-Allaah ibn Jibreen.

 If you think that you are obliged to so something haraam in your work, then look for other work. We ask Allaah to make your provision halaal. May Allaah bless our Prophet Muhammad

Islam Q&A
Sheikh Muhammed Salih Al-Munajjid


Going to visit places and mosques in which the Prophet prayed
I see some people when they visit Madeenah, going to the seven mosques in addition to al-Masjid al-Nabawi (the Prophet’s Mosque) and Masjid Quba’. In al-Taa’if they make sure that they visit Masjid ‘Addaas, and they want to visit mosques in Makkah in order to pray there. What is the ruling on this?

Praise be to Allaah. 

Travelling to visit al-Masjid al-Nabawi is an action which is prescribed in sharee’ah as indicated by the hadeeth of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him): “No journey should be made to visit mosques except for  three: this mosque of mine [in Madeenah], al-Masjid al-Haraam [in Makkah] and al-Masjid al-Aqsa [in al-Quds/Jerusalem]. (Narrated by al-Bukhaari and Muslim; this version narrated by Muslim). Prayer in (al-Masjid al-Nabawi) is better than a thousand prayers anywhere else, apart from al-Masjid al-Haraam. 

Other places which it is prescribed to visit without travelling expressly for that purpose are the grave of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), the graves of his two companions [Abu Bakr and ‘Umar], the graves of the people of al-Baqee’ [the cemetery of Madeenah], the graves of the martyrs of Uhud, and finally, the mosque of Quba’. 

With regard to visiting those graves, this is implied in the general meaning of the hadeeth of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him): “I used to forbid you to visit graves but now visit them.” 

Shaykh al-Islam [Ibn Taymiyah] (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: “It is also mustahabb (recommended) to visit the graves of the people of al-Baqee’ and the martyrs of Uhud, to pray for them and ask for forgiveness for them, because the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) used to do this, but this is prescribed for all the Muslim graves.” (Majmoo’ al-Fataawa, 17/470) 

The evidence for visiting the Mosque of Quba’ is the hadeeth narrated in al-Saheehayn from Ibn ‘Umar (may Allaah be pleased with him) who said: “The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) used to come to Quba’ riding and walking.” According to another report: “and he would pray two rak’ahs there.” (narrated by al-Bukhaari and Muslim). The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) also said, “Whoever purifies himself in his house then comes to the mosque of Quba’ and prays there, he will have a reward like that for ‘Umrah.” (Narrated by Ahmad, al-Nasaa’i, Ibn Maajah and al-Haakim. Al-Haakim classed it as saheeh and al-Dhahabi agreed with him. Also classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in Saheeh al-Jaami’, 6154) 

With regard to visiting other mosques and historical sites and claiming that they are “places which a person should visit”, there is no basis for doing this, and they should not be visited for the following reasons: 

1-                  There is no shar’i evidence to suggest that these mosques should be singled out for visits, as there is in the case of Masjid Quba’. As is well known, acts of worship should be based on following (the Sunnah), not on innovations.

2-                  The Sahaabah (may Allaah be pleased with them) were the most keen of all people to follow the Sunnah of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him). None of them are known to have visited those mosques and historical sites. If this were a good thing they would have been the first ones to do it.

Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: “Abu Bakr, ‘Umar, ‘Uthmaan, ‘Ali and all the predecessors of the Muhaajiroon and Ansaar used to travel from Madeenah to Makkah to perform Hajj and ‘Umrah, or for other purposes, and none of them said that he was keen to pray in the places where the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) had prayed. It is known that if this had been mustahabb in their view, they would have been the first ones to do it, for they had more knowledge of the Sunnah and followed it more closely than anyone else.” (Iqtidaa’ al-Siraat al-Mustaqeem, 2/748).

3-                  Visits to these places should be disallowed as a preventative measure. This is indicated by the actions of the righteous salaf, above all the rightly-guided khaleefah ‘Umar ibn al-Khattaab (may Allaah be pleased with him). It was narrated that al-Ma’roor ibn Suwayd (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: “We went out with ‘Umar ibn al-Khattaab and we came across a mosque on our route. The people rushed to pray in that mosque, and ‘Umar said, ‘What is the matter with them?’ They said, ‘This is a mosque in which the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) prayed.’ ‘Umar said: ‘O people, those who came before you were destroyed because they followed such (practices) until they made them places of worship. Whoever happens to be there at the time of prayer, let him pray there, and whoever is not there at the time of prayer, let him continue his journey.’” (Narrated by Ibn Waddah in his book al-Bida’ wa’l-Nahiy ‘anhaa; classed as saheeh by Ibn Taymiyah in al-Majmoo’, 1/281).

Shaykh al-Islam (may Allaah have mercy on him) said, commenting on this story, “The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) had not singled out that place for prayer; he prayed there only because he happened to be staying there. Hence ‘Umar thought that imitating him outwardly without having the same reason for doing so did not count as following the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him). Singling out that place for prayer was like the innovations of the People of the Book which had led to their doom, so he forbade the Muslims to imitate them in this manner. The one who did that was imitating the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) in outward appearances, but he was imitating the Jews and Christians in his intention, which is the action of the heart. The action of the heart is what counts, because following in one’s intention is more serious than following in outward appearances.” (Majmoo’ al-Fataawa, 1/281)

In another example, it is narrated that ‘Umar ibn al-Khattaab (may Allaah be pleased with him) heard that some people were visiting the tree under which the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) had accepted the bay’ah of people, so he commanded that it should be cut down.” (Narrated by Ibn Waddaah in his book al-Bida’ wa’l-Nahiy ‘anhaa, and by Ibn Abi Shaybah in al-Musannaf, 2/375. Its isnaad was classed as saheeh by Ibn Hajar in Fath al-Baari, 7/448.Al-Albaani (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: the men of its isnaad are thiqaat).

Ibn Waddaah al-Qurtubi (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: “Maalik ibn Anas and other scholars of Madeenah regarded it as makrooh to go to those mosques and historical sites connected to the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), apart from Quba’ and Uhud.” (al-Bida’ wa’l-Nahiy ‘anhaa, p. 43). What is meant by Uhud is visiting the graves of the martyrs of Uhud.

Shaykh al-Islam (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: “Hence the scholars of the salaf among the people of Madeenah and elsewhere did not regard it as mustahabb to set out to visit any places in and around Madeenah after the Mosque of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), apart from the mosque of Quba’, because the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) did not specify any mosque to be visited apart from that.” (Majmoo’ al-Fataawa, 17/469).

Shaykh ‘Abd al-‘Azeez ibn Baaz (may Allaah have mercy on him) said, after mentioning the places which it is prescribed to visit in Madeenah: “With regard to the seven mosques, Masjid al-Qiblatayn (the Mosque of the Two Qiblahs), and other places which some authors who wrote about the rituals of Hajj include among the places to be visited, there is no basis for doing that, and there is no evidence for doing so. What is prescribed for the believer at all times is to follow [the Sunnah], not to innovate.” (Fataawa Islamiyyah, 2/313)

The prominent scholar Shaykh Muhammad ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah preserve him) said: “There are no places in Madeenah to be visited apart from these: al-Masjid al-Nabawi, the grave of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), al-Baqee’, the martyrs of Uhud, and the Mosque of Quba’. As for other sites, there is no basis for visiting them.” (Fiqh al-‘Ibaadaat, p. 405)

Some may think that as long as one does not believe that these places hold any special virtue, that justifies visiting them or other historical places. This idea is unacceptable, for the following reasons: 

Firstly: the righteous salaf (may Allaah have mercy on them) forbade going to these places in absolute terms, without going into detail.

Secondly: going to these places and singling them out to visit because they are in the vicinity of Madeenah which witnessed the dawn of the Islamic call or because some battles happened there, proves that one believes in their virtue. If one did not hold such a belief, there would be no motive for visiting these places.

Thirdly: if we accept, for the sake of argument, that a person does not believe in their virtue, visiting them is still a means that may lead to that and to doing things that are not prescribed. Taking preventative measures is one of the things prescribed by sharee’ah, as is well known. Al-‘Allaamah Ibn al-Qayyim – may Allaah have mercy on him – gave ninety-nine examples illustrating this principle, and after giving the ninety-ninth example he said: “Taking preventative means is one-quarter of responsibility, for there are commands and prohibitions. The commands are of two types, one of which is the end in itself and the other is the means to that end. And prohibitions are of two types, the thing that is prohibited because it is evil in and of itself, and the means that lead to that evil. So preventing the means that lead to that which is haraam is one quarter of the religion.” (I’laam al-Muwaqqi’een, 3/143)

Fourthly: It gives wrong ideas to ignorant people; when they see many people visiting those mosques and historical sites, they will think that this is an action which is prescribed in Islam.

Fifthly: Going to extremes in that matter and calling for visits to historical sites such as Mount Uhud and Jabal al-Noor for leisure purposes is one of the means that lead to shirk. The Standing Committee for Issuing Fatwas issued a fatwa (No. 5303) stating that it is not allowed to climb up to the Cave of Hiraa’ for that reason. And Allaah is the One Whose help we seek.

 Al-Da’wah magazine, issue #1754, p. 55


Taxi driver taking passengers to forbidden places
Assalaamu 'Alaykum
A brother is a taxi driver and faces some difficulties for which he requires sincere advice.
He says that often times a passenger will get in the vehicle and after a portion of the journey asks him to stop at the liquor store so he can pick up his booze.
Also, some people may require him to take them to very undesirable places such as night clubs or places of that sort. Is it permissible to do a job that requires such things?

Praise be to Allaah.

We put this question to Shaykh Muhammad ibn Saalih al-‘Uthaymeen: one of our brothers in Canada is working as a taxi driver, and says that often, after taking on a passenger and commencing the journey, the passenger asks him to stop near a liquor store so that he can buy something from there. Some passengers also ask him to take them to places such as nightclubs. Is it permissible for him to work in this occupation or to accept these fares?

The shaykh, may Allaah preserve him, replied as follows:

No, it is not permissible for him to stop at the liquor store for his passenger to buy some, and it is not permissible for him to take anyone to forbidden clubs, because Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): “… Help you one another in al-birr and al-taqwa (virtue, righteousness and piety); but do not help one another in sin and transgression…” [al-Maa’idah 5:2].

And Allaah knows best.

Islam Q&A
Sheikh Muhammed Salih Al-Munajjid
Travel and tourism (siyaahah)